Amanda Knox

U.S. student Amanda Knox guilty of murdering her 21-year-old roommate Meredith Kercher


A woman believed to be Amanda Knox, center, is hidden under a jacket while being escorted from her mother's home to a car by family members , Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, in Seattle. Amanda Knox says she is frightened and saddened by her "unjust" murder conviction in the death of her British roommate Meredith Kercher. Knox's lawyers have vowed to appeal to Italy's highest court. In a statement issued from Seattle on Thursday after her conviction was upheld, Knox blamed overzealous prosecutors and a "prejudiced and narrow-minded investigation" for what she called a perversion of justice and wrongful conviction. (AP Photo)

A woman believed to be Amanda Knox, center, is hidden under a jacket while being escorted from her mother’s home to a car by family members , Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, in Seattle. Amanda Knox says she is frightened and saddened by her “unjust” murder conviction in the death of her British roommate Meredith Kercher. Knox’s lawyers have vowed to appeal to Italy’s highest court. In a statement issued from Seattle on Thursday after her conviction was upheld, Knox blamed overzealous prosecutors and a “prejudiced and narrow-minded investigation” for what she called a perversion of justice and wrongful conviction. (AP Photo)

SEATTLE (AP) — Amanda Knox was in her hometown of Seattle when she received the news Thursday that an Italian appeals court upheld the guilty verdict against her and her ex-boyfriend in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate.

David Marriott, a spokesman for Knox’s family, said Knox awaited the ruling at her mother’s home. After the decision was announced, a person believed to be Knox emerged from the house. That person, surrounded by others and covered by a coat, got into a vehicle and was driven away.

When asked how Knox was doing, her mother, Edda Mellas, said: “She’s upset. How would you be?”

Knox said in a written statement that she was “frightened and saddened,” she “expected better from the Italian justice system,” and “this has gotten out of hand.”

The University of Washington student was sentenced to 28 1/2 years in prison, raising the specter of a long legal battle over her extradition.

Now 26 years old, she remained in Seattle during the trial with no intention of returning to Italy. Knox said she and her family “have suffered greatly from this wrongful persecution.”

The court reinstated a guilty verdict first handed down against Knox and Raffaele Sollecito in 2009. The verdict was overturned in 2011, but Italy’s supreme court vacated that decision and sent the case back for a third trial in Florence.

In her statement, Knox acknowledged the family of Meredith Kercher, her roommate in Italy.

“First and foremost it must be recognized that there is no consolation for the Kercher family. Their grief over Meredith’s terrible murder will follow them forever. They deserve respect and support,” she said.

She implored officials in Italy to fix problems with the justice system, and she blamed overzealous prosecutors and a “prejudiced and narrow-minded investigation” for what she called a perversion of justice and wrongful conviction.

FLORENCE, Italy (AP) — Amanda Knox says she is frightened and saddened by her “unjust” murder conviction in the death of her British roommate Meredith Kercher.

Knox’s lawyers have vowed to appeal to Italy’s highest court.

In a statement issued from Seattle on Thursday after her conviction was upheld, Knox blamed overzealous prosecutors and a “prejudiced and narrow-minded investigation” for what she called a perversion of justice and wrongful conviction.

She said she expected more from the Italian justice system.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

An appeals court in Florence on Thursday upheld the guilty verdict against U.S. student Amanda Knox and her ex-boyfriend for the 2007 murder of her British roommate. Knox was sentenced to 28 1/2 years in prison, raising the specter of a long legal battle over her extradition.

After nearly 12 hours of deliberations, the court reinstated the guilty verdict first handed down against Knox and Raffaele Sollecito in 2009. The verdict had been overturned in 2011 and the pair freed from prison, but Italy’s supreme court vacated that decision and sent the case back for a third trial in Florence.

Sollecito, whose lawyers said they would appeal the verdict, was sentenced to 25 years. Reached by telephone, Knox’s father, Curt Knox, said he had no comment.

While Sollecito was in court Thursday morning, he didn’t return for the verdict, and the 26-year-old Knox was home in Seattle awaiting the decision with, in her own words, “my heart in my throat.”

Sollecito’s lawyers said they were stunned and would take their appeal to Italy’s top court. “There isn’t a shred of proof,” said attorney Luca Maori said.

Presiding Judge Alessando Nencini ordered the 29-year-old Sollecito’s passport revoked but made no requests for Knox’s movements to be limited, saying she was “justifiably abroad.”

Knox’s defense team gave its last round of rebuttals earlier in the day, ending four months of arguments in Knox’s and Sollecito’s third trial for the 2007 murder of her British roommate, Meredith Kercher, in the Italian university town of Perugia.

Knox’s lawyer, Carlo Dalla Vedova, had told the court he was “serene” about the verdict because he believes the only conclusion from the files is “the innocence of Amanda Knox.”

“It is not possible to convict a person because it is probable that she is guilty,” Dalla Vedova said. “The penal code does not foresee probability. It foresees certainty.”

Dalla Vedova evoked Dante, noting that the Florentine writer reserved the lower circle of hell for those who betrayed trust, as he asserted that police had done to Knox when they held her overnight for questioning without legal representation and without advising her that she was a suspect.

Knox had returned to Seattle after spending four years in jail before being acquitted in 2011. In an email to this court, Knox wrote that she feared a wrongful conviction.

She told Italian state TV in an interview earlier this month that she would wait for the verdict at her mother’s house “with my heart in my throat.”

Knox’s absence didn’t formally hurt her case since she was freed by a court and defendants in Italy are not required to appear at their trials. However, Nencini reacted sternly to her emailed statement, noting that defendants have a right to be heard if they appear in person.

Sollecito, on the other hand, had made frequent court appearances, always in a purple sweater, the color of the local Florentine soccer club. He was in court again Thursday morning, accompanied by his father and other relatives and said he would return for the verdict. But he didn’t come for the verdict.

COLLEEN BARRY

Source: AP

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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JR says:

Perugia student: I hope that you are “studying” law, because clearly you know nothing about it. calling people sluts and hyenas does not prove their guilt. evidence such as DNA and a sufficient amount of it too. oh and there is also that thing called reasonable doubt…like if the guy who already confessed to the murder left huge amounts of DNA, blood and semen in the room but barely any trace of the other two suspects – then its reasonable to doubt that those two people magically cleaned up the invisible sources of their own DNA but left the DNA of the guy they were trying to frame.

im not from a trailer, my dad is a lawyer, i studied law and i get overwhelmed with sadness and horror seeing that poor Meredith left for dead, alone in that blanket. i cried seeing her family cry and I cried seeing Amanda and her family cry. I could not imagine having my sister murdered and I could not imagine being in a country barely knowing the language and being interrogated about a murder without a translator or a lawyer or the right to even sleep so I could think straight. yes she told some lies in her initial confession but not because she killed her roommate. it happens all the time, people get yelled at by police for hours and they finally get to a point where they cant stand it so they say whatever makes the police happy at that moment just so it ends.

murder is a big deal everywhere. such a big deal, you better be damn sure before you convict someone of it.

   
perugia student says:

ah …thank god justice was served..
they’re both guilty as hell…

   
RipleyInCT says:

I watched this woman’s interview on something like Dateline or 60 minutes- she is lying. She’s pathological, and reminded me far too much of Jodi Arias that it isn’t even funny. Best 2 out of 3. She loses. The poor woman they murdered loses.

   
perugia student says:

they are guilty ..
the US media influenced many people who did not know about the case..
they are both sadistic psychos…
black guy was set up ..
he was the boyfriend ..

   
Kristine says:

Will this hell ever end for this young woman?

Completely changing the basic premise of this case from sex-play to an argument over a dirty apartment, boggles the mind. It’s the “lets fling as much crap against the wall and see what eventually sticks” prosecution. What happened to trying a person based on reputable facts? Scientific evidence? Why are they giving the guy who was convicted and who actually committed this crime so much validity? This is a kangaroo court. If they do try to extradite her, I hope the US court system will ultimately protect her.

Italy is definitely off of my list of places I someday want to visit. Too scary –

God bless you, Amanda – keep your head up and rest on your truth.

   
perugia student says:

yes don’t come here please ..
we had enuf with american sluts who are entitled & think they can do whatever they want ..
including murder ..
stay in the ‘bumfuk’ trailerpark where you belong hon’…lol

   
Jessica says:

People in other countries think she is guilty as you know what. Based on what she says, I would say she is not! Is this a witch hunt or is it possible Amanda Knox is guilty?

   
perugia student says:

she’s guilty as hell & you know it …
did you think the parents of the murdered girl ..a UK citizen would let this go ?
or not insist on justice for the true killers?..
she framed another person for the crime when she testisfied..
she lied about everything .
do you honestly think a small town like perugia does not see what’s ging on ?
murder may not be a bg deal in the states but here , it STILL is ..
try to get the truth if you care about an innocent students’ life cut short for no reason…except sadistic pleasure for 2 demonic hyenas…

   

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