Jodi Arias: Hell Hath No Fury

Court considers media’s request in Jodi Arias case


Jodi Arias sits in the Maricopa County Superior Court room of Judge Sherry Stephens in Phoenix, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, as the opening statements in her penalty phase retrial begins. The 34-year-old Arias was convicted of murder last year, but the first jury was deadlocked on whether to give her the death penalty or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)

Jodi Arias sits in the Maricopa County Superior Court room of Judge Sherry Stephens in Phoenix, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, as the opening statements in her penalty phase retrial begins. The 34-year-old Arias was convicted of murder last year, but the first jury was deadlocked on whether to give her the death penalty or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)

PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona appeals court is considering whether to put on hold a trial judge’s decision barring the public from watching testimony from the first witness called by convicted murderer Jodi Arias’ defense.

Lawyers for The Arizona Republic, KPNX-TV, KPHO-TV and KTVK-TV want the testimony halted while they appeal Judge Sherry Stephens’ ruling allowing the unidentified defense witness to testify in private.

A Court of Appeals panel did not rule immediately after a hearing Monday.

Arias’ attorneys have said interrupting the testimony could cause a mistrial by prolonging the case to where jurors might no longer be available after the trial’s projected mid-December conclusion.

Arias was convicted in her ex-boyfriend’s death, but jurors deadlocked on her punishment. A new jury will decide whether she’ll be sentenced to life imprisonment or death.

Source: AP

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Share this post!
Facebook Twitter Linkedin Email Pinterest

Comments

tab  
Trish says:

Excuse me, Judge Stevens, but in America trials are, by Constitutional law, to be open to the public. Even the 1993 WTC bomb defendants were tried in open court. There is no reason in the world to permit a brutal convicted murderer to testify in her own sentencing hearing outside of the view of the American public.

   

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *