Colorado Movie Theater Massacre

Judge in Colorado theater shooting trial dismisses 3 jurors


District Attorney George Brauchcer, left, questions state-appointed psychiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Metzner, center, as Judge Carlos Samour, Jr., looks on at right during trial testimony in Centennial, Colo., Monday, June 8, 2015. Metzner testified that Colorado theater shooter James Holmes was mentally ill at the time of a deadly attack that killed 12 people and wounded 70 others during the midnight premiere of a Batman film. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)

District Attorney George Brauchcer, left, questions state-appointed psychiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Metzner, center, as Judge Carlos Samour, Jr., looks on at right during trial testimony in Centennial, Colo., Monday, June 8, 2015. Metzner testified that Colorado theater shooter James Holmes was mentally ill at the time of a deadly attack that killed 12 people and wounded 70 others during the midnight premiere of a Batman film. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)

CENTENNIAL, Colorado (AP) — Three jurors in a high-profile theater shooting trial in Colorado were dismissed Tuesday amid concern they violated orders not to talk about media coverage of the case.

James Holmes, a former graduate neuroscience student, stands accused of opening fire on a crowded suburban Denver movie theater in 2012, killing 12 people and injuring 70. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

On Tuesday, Judge Carlos A. Samour Jr. first dismissed two jurors in the trial, including a woman who says her husband called her and told her about a tweet about the case from the district attorney.

The judge then decided to dismiss a third juror who might have heard discussion about news reports on the case. A total of 21 jurors and alternates remain. Jurors are allowed to go home every night, but they can’t discuss the case with anyone or see or read anything about it.

Under Colorado law, the jury will determine whether Holmes was sane or insane. If the jurors find he is guilty, they will decide on the sentence — death, or life without parole. If he is found not guilty by reason of insanity, he would be committed indefinitely to the state mental hospital.

Source: AP

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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