Aaron Hernandez

No verdict after 4 days of deliberations in Hernandez trial


Former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez, right, sits with defense attorney Charles Rankin, left, as the judge and attorneys for both sides discuss questions about evidence from the jury deliberating Hernandez's fate, during his murder trial Thursday, April 9, 2015, in Fall River, Mass. Hernandez is charged with killing Odin Lloyd. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, Pool)

Former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez, right, sits with defense attorney Charles Rankin, left, as the judge and attorneys for both sides discuss questions about evidence from the jury deliberating Hernandez’s fate, during his murder trial Thursday, April 9, 2015, in Fall River, Mass. Hernandez is charged with killing Odin Lloyd. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, Pool)

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — Jurors in the murder trial of former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez completed a fourth day of deliberations on Friday with no verdict.

The twelve jurors have spent nearly 20 hours over four days considering whether to convict Hernandez of the June 2013 killing of Odin Lloyd. Lloyd was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee. Hernandez’s lawyer acknowledged the former NFL player was there when Lloyd was killed but says he didn’t do it.

Superior Court Judge Susan Garsh sent jurors home Friday afternoon, telling them to return Monday morning.

“Please continue to avoid anything at all about this case or about Mr. Hernandez,” the judge told them.

She has asked them to avoid the news in general on TV, on the radio and elsewhere.

Hernandez, who grew up in Bristol, Connecticut, was brought into court twice on Friday, at the beginning and the end of the day, both times for just a few minutes. His fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins, sat behind him in the front row. Her sister, Shaneah Jenkins, who was dating Lloyd when he was killed, sat across the aisle with Lloyd’s family.

Besides the murder charge, jurors are deciding whether to convict Hernandez on charges of illegal possession of a .45-caliber firearm and .22-caliber ammunition. Lloyd was killed with a .45-caliber weapon, although the gun was never found. Police found .22-caliber ammunition in Hernandez’s basement.

Jurors must be unanimous to reach a verdict. On the murder charge, they must decide on 1st-degree or 2nd-degree murder. Second-degree murder carries a sentence of life with the possibility of parole after 15 years, while parole is not possible with a 1st-degree murder conviction.

MICHELLE R. SMITH

Source: AP

Copyright 2015 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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