Criminal & Civil Justice News

Airport shooting suspect due in Florida federal court


In this Jan. 9, 2017, file photo, Esteban Santiago is taken from the Broward County main jail as he is transported to the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Just weeks before a gunman opened fire at Fort Lauderdale's airport, he walked into an FBI office in Alaska telling authorities the government was controlling his mind and that he was having terroristic thoughts. Authorities say such walk-ins are a daily occurrence around the country. Assessing whether the people are reporting a credible threat or whether they need medical help is extremely difficult and drains already-stretched law enforcement resources. (Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

In this Jan. 9, 2017, file photo, Esteban Santiago is taken from the Broward County main jail as he is transported to the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Just weeks before a gunman opened fire at Fort Lauderdale’s airport, he walked into an FBI office in Alaska telling authorities the government was controlling his mind and that he was having terroristic thoughts. Authorities say such walk-ins are a daily occurrence around the country. Assessing whether the people are reporting a credible threat or whether they need medical help is extremely difficult and drains already-stretched law enforcement resources. (Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

MIAMI (AP) — The Alaska man accused of killing five people and wounding six in a Florida airport shooting rampage is due in federal court.

A Miami federal judge scheduled a Thursday afternoon status hearing for 26-year-old Esteban Santiago. Prosecutors say Santiago flew from Anchorage, Alaska, to Florida on Jan. 6 where he opened fire at a baggage claim area of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

Santiago has been indicted on 22 federal charges that could bring the death penalty. He has pleaded not guilty.

Santiago told FBI agents after the shooting he was under some form of government mind control. Later, he said the shooting was inspired by the Islamic State extremist group.

Before the shooting, Santiago was briefly treated at an Alaska hospital after telling authorities he had been hearing voices.

CURT ANDERSON

Source: AP

Copyright 2016 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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