Colorado Movie Theater Massacre

Testimony to begin in civil trial against Colorado theater


In this July 21, 2012 file photo, three helicopters make a flyover of the Century Theater in Aurora, Colo., a day after twelve people were killed and dozens were injured in the attack early Friday at the packed theater during a showing of the Batman movie, "Dark Knight Rises." When a group claiming credit for the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment threated violence against theaters showing “The Interview” earlier this week, the fate of the movie was all but sealed. Even though law enforcement didn’t deem the threats of violence credible, theater owners and Sony undoubtedly considered the 2012 massacre of a dozen people in a Colorado movie theater. (AP Photo/Barry Gutierrez, File)

In this July 21, 2012 file photo, three helicopters make a flyover of the Century Theater in Aurora, Colo., a day after twelve people were killed and dozens were injured in the attack early Friday at the packed theater during a showing of the Batman movie, “Dark Knight Rises.” When a group claiming credit for the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment threated violence against theaters showing “The Interview” earlier this week, the fate of the movie was all but sealed. Even though law enforcement didn’t deem the threats of violence credible, theater owners and Sony undoubtedly considered the 2012 massacre of a dozen people in a Colorado movie theater. (AP Photo/Barry Gutierrez, File)

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — Opening statements are set to begin in a civil trial over whether the company that owns a Colorado movie theater should have done more to prevent a 2012 shooting there.

Attorneys will deliver their statements Tuesday morning before six jurors and two alternates begin hearing testimony in the case against Cinemark. Jurors will be asked to decide whether, in an age of mass shootings, the company should have foreseen the shooting that left 12 dead and more than 70 others injured.

Twenty-eight victims and their families are suing the theater company in state court. Their lawsuit says Cinemark should have had silent alarms and armed guards at the packed midnight premiere of a Batman film, where James Holmes launched his attack.

Holmes was sentenced last year to life in prison.

Source: AP

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